Economics » Unemployment » What Causes Changes in Unemployment over the Long Run

What Causes Changes in Unemployment Over the Long Run

Cyclical unemployment explains why unemployment rises during a recession and falls during an economic expansion. But what explains the remaining level of unemployment even in good economic times? Why is the unemployment rate never zero? Even when the U.S. economy is growing strongly, the unemployment rate only rarely dips as low as 4%. Moreover, the discussion earlier in this tutorial pointed out that unemployment rates in many European countries like Italy, France, and Germany have often been remarkably high at various times in the last few decades.

Why does some level of unemployment persist even when economies are growing strongly? Why are unemployment rates continually higher in certain economies, through good economic years and bad? Economists have a term to describe the remaining level of unemployment that occurs even when the economy is healthy: it is called the natural rate of unemployment.


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