Biology » The Respiratory System » Systems of Gas Exchange

Tracheal Systems

Tracheal Systems

Insect respiration is independent of its circulatory system; therefore, the blood does not play a direct role in oxygen transport. Insects have a highly specialized type of respiratory system called the tracheal system, which consists of a network of small tubes that carries oxygen to the entire body. The tracheal system is the most direct and efficient respiratory system in active animals. The tubes in the tracheal system are made of a polymeric material called chitin.

Insect bodies have openings, called spiracles, along the thorax and abdomen. These openings connect to the tubular network, allowing oxygen to pass into the body (see the figure below) and regulating the diffusion of CO2 and water vapor. Air enters and leaves the tracheal system through the spiracles. Some insects can ventilate the tracheal system with body movements.

The illustration shows the tracheal system of a bee. Openings called spiracles appear along the side of the body. Vertical tubes lead from the spiracles to a tube that runs along the top of the body from front to back.

Insects perform respiration via a tracheal system.

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