Biology » The Respiratory System » Systems of Gas Exchange

Direct Diffusion

Direct Diffusion

For small multicellular organisms, diffusion across the outer membrane is sufficient to meet their oxygen needs. Gas exchange by direct diffusion across surface membranes is efficient for organisms less than 1 mm in diameter. In simple organisms, such as cnidarians and flatworms, every cell in the body is close to the external environment. Their cells are kept moist and gases diffuse quickly via direct diffusion.

Flatworms are small, literally flat worms, which ‘breathe’ through diffusion across the outer membrane (see the figure below). The flat shape of these organisms increases the surface area for diffusion, ensuring that each cell within the body is close to the outer membrane surface and has access to oxygen. If the flatworm had a cylindrical body, then the cells in the center would not be able to get oxygen.

The photo shows a worm with a flat, ribbon-like body, resting on sand. The worm is black with white spots.

This flatworm’s process of respiration works by diffusion across the outer membrane. (credit: Stephen Childs)

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