Biology » Plant and Animal Tissues » Plant Tissues

Plant Tissues

Tissues

Tissue is a level of organisation that falls between cells and a complete organism. Therefore a tissue is a group of similar cells that perform a specific function. Organs are then formed by the functional grouping together of multiple tissues.

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The diagram above depicts how several cells adapted for the same function work in conjunction to form tissues, and together form an organ.

In this tutorial, we will be studying plant and animal tissues, starting with plant tissues.

Plant Tissues

Fact:

There are over 200 000 types of plant species in the world. Green plants provide the Earth’s oxygen, and also directly or indirectly provide food for all animals because of their ability to photosynthesise. Plants also provide the source of most of our drugs and medicines. The scientific study of plants is known as botany.

Plants are typically made up of roots, stems and leaves. Plant tissues can be broadly categorised into dividing, meristematic tissue or non-dividing, permanent tissue. Permanent tissue is made up of simple and complex tissues.

The figure below provides an overview of the types of plant tissues being studied in this tutorial.

Image

The diagram above depicts how several cells adapted for the same function work in conjunction to form tissues.

It is important that for each tissue type you understand:

  • where it is located
  • what its key structural features are and how these relate to function
  • how each tissue type looks under the microscope
  • how to draw biological diagrams of each structure

Video: Plants (Structure, Transport and Xerophytic Adaptations)

Learn more about plant tissues in this optional video below:

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This is a lesson from the tutorial, Plant and Animal Tissues and you are encouraged to log in or register, so that you can track your progress.

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