National Council of Nigerians and the Cameroons

National Council of Nigerians and the Cameroons (NCNC)

The NCNC was formed in 1944. The first president was Herbert Macaulay and the first General Secretary was Dr. Nnamdi Azikwe. At the death of Herbert Macaulay, Nnamdi Azikwe became the president and when Southern Cameroon left Nigeria in August 1944, the NCNC changed its name to the National Council for Nigerian Citizens. This party was seen by some scholars as a truly national party.

AIMS/OBJECTIVES OF NCNC

  • To educate the masses on the benefits of political freedom, social equality, and religious tolerance.
  • To fight against British imperialism.
  • To educate the Nigerian people politically.
  • To educate Nigerians up to higher level so as to be well prepared for leadership positions.
  • To unite the people against a common goal.

ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE NCNC

  • United nationalist leaders for the fight against colonial rule.
  • It made Nigerians to be politically conscious.
  • The NCNC was instrumental to Nigeria’s attainment of independence.
  • It fostered good education to the people politically.
  • It formed the regional government of Eastern Nigeria that led to the development of the zone.

DEVELOPMENT OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF NIGERIANS AND THE CAMEROONS (NCNC)

  • Reactivation of the Party: This was a bold step taken by Dr. Nnamdi Azikwe to make the party more effective.
  • Tribal Sentiments: The Igbo Union in Lagos prevailed on Dr. Nnamdi Azikwe to form a new party and this led to the formation of NCNC.
  • Split: The first development was as a result of the split in the Nigerian Youth Movement (NYM) over representation of the party in the vacant legislative council seat in 1941.
  • Change of Name: The name of the party was changed to the National Council of Nigerian Citizens when Cameroon ceased to be part of Nigeria.

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