Economics » International Economic Organisations » Roles and Relevance of International Organisations

European Economic Community (EEC)

The EEC was a regional organisation that aimed to bring about economic integration among its member states. It was created by the Treaty of Rome of 1957. Upon the formation of the European Union (EU) in 1993, the EEC was incorporated and renamed the European Community (EC). In 2009, the EC’s institutions were absorbed into the EU’s wider framework and the community ceased to exist.

The Community’s initial aim was to bring about economic integration, including a common market and customs union, among its six founding members: Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and West Germany.

The main aim of the EEC, as stated in its preamble, was to “preserve peace and liberty and to lay the foundations of an ever closer union among the peoples of Europe”. Calling for balanced economic growth, this was to be accomplished through:

  1. The establishment of a customs union with a common external tariff.
  2. Common policies for agriculture, transport and trade, including standardisation.
  3. Enlargement of the EEC to the rest of Europe.

Continue With the Mobile App | Available on Google Play

[Attributions and Licenses]


This is a lesson from the tutorial, International Economic Organisations and you are encouraged to log in or register, so that you can track your progress.

Log In

Share Thoughts