Biology » Gene Expression » Regulation of Gene Expression

Summarizing Regulation of Gene Expression

Summary

While all somatic cells within an organism contain the same DNA, not all cells within that organism express the same proteins. Prokaryotic organisms express the entire DNA they encode in every cell, but not necessarily all at the same time. Proteins are expressed only when they are needed. Eukaryotic organisms express a subset of the DNA that is encoded in any given cell. In each cell type, the type and amount of protein is regulated by controlling gene expression.

To express a protein, the DNA is first transcribed into RNA, which is then translated into proteins. In prokaryotic cells, these processes occur almost simultaneously. In eukaryotic cells, transcription occurs in the nucleus and is separate from the translation that occurs in the cytoplasm. Gene expression in prokaryotes is mostly regulated at the transcriptional level (some epigenetic and post-translational regulation is also present), whereas in eukaryotic cells, gene expression is regulated at the epigenetic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels.

Glossary

epigenetic

heritable changes that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence

gene expression

processes that control the turning on or turning off of a gene

post-transcriptional

control of gene expression after the RNA molecule has been created but before it is translated into protein

post-translational

control of gene expression after a protein has been created

[Attributions and Licenses]


This is a lesson from the tutorial, Gene Expression and you are encouraged to log in or register, so that you can track your progress.

Log In

Share Thoughts