Biology » Cell Reproduction » Prokaryotic Cell Division

Summarizing Prokaryotic Cell Division

Summary

In both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell division, the genomic DNA is replicated and then each copy is allocated into a daughter cell. In addition, the cytoplasmic contents are divided evenly and distributed to the new cells. However, there are many differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell division. Bacteria have a single, circular DNA chromosome but no nucleus. Therefore, mitosis is not necessary in bacterial cell division. Bacterial cytokinesis is directed by a ring composed of a protein called FtsZ. Ingrowth of membrane and cell wall material from the periphery of the cells results in the formation of a septum that eventually constructs the separate cell walls of the daughter cells.

Glossary

binary fission

prokaryotic cell division process

FtsZ

tubulin-like protein component of the prokaryotic cytoskeleton that is important in prokaryotic cytokinesis (name origin: Filamenting temperature-sensitive mutant Z)

origin

(also, ORI) region of the prokaryotic chromosome where replication begins (origin of replication)

septum

structure formed in a bacterial cell as a precursor to the separation of the cell into two daughter cells

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