Chemistry » Acid-Base Equilibria » Hydrolysis of Salt Solutions

Acid-Base Neutralization

Hydrolysis of Salt Solutions

As we have seen in the tutorial on chemical reactions, when an acid and base are mixed, they undergo a neutralization reaction. The word “neutralization” seems to imply that a stoichiometrically equivalent solution of an acid and a base would be neutral. This is sometimes true, but the salts that are formed in these reactions may have acidic or basic properties of their own, as we shall now see.

Acid-Base Neutralization

A solution is neutral when it contains equal concentrations of hydronium and hydroxide ions. When we mix solutions of an acid and a base, an acid-base neutralization reaction occurs. However, even if we mix stoichiometrically equivalent quantities, we may find that the resulting solution is not neutral. It could contain either an excess of hydronium ions or an excess of hydroxide ions because the nature of the salt formed determines whether the solution is acidic, neutral, or basic. The following four situations illustrate how solutions with various pH values can arise following a neutralization reaction using stoichiometrically equivalent quantities:

  1. A strong acid and a strong base, such as HCl(aq) and NaOH(aq) will react to form a neutral solution since the conjugate partners produced are of negligible strength (see this chart):

    \(\text{HCl}\left(aq\right)+\text{NaOH}\left(aq\right)\phantom{\rule{0.2em}{0ex}}⇌\phantom{\rule{0.2em}{0ex}}\text{NaCl}\left(aq\right)+{\text{H}}_{2}\text{O}\left(l\right)\)

  2. A strong acid and a weak base yield a weakly acidic solution. The products of this neutralization reaction are the conjugate base of the strong acid (Kb ≈ 0, so it doesn’t affect pH) and the conjugate acid of the weak base (Ka > 0, so it ionizes to make the solution acidic).
  3. A weak acid and a strong base yield a weakly basic solution. The products of this neutralization reaction are the conjugate acid of the strong base (Ka ≈ 0, so it doesn’t affect pH) and the conjugate base of the weak acid (Kb > 0, so it ionizes to make the solution basic).
  4. A weak acid plus a weak base can yield either an acidic or basic solution. This is the most complex of the four types of reactions. When the conjugate acid and the conjugate base are of unequal strengths, the solution can be either acidic or basic, depending on the relative strengths of the two conjugates. To predict whether a particular combination will be acidic or basic, tabulated K values of the conjugates must be compared. (Note: occasionally the weak acid and the weak base can have the same strength, so their respective conjugate base and acid will have the same strength, and the solution will be neutral.)

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