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Laws of Learning – The Law of Revision



Many people have not come to realize that their memory can recall tens of thousands of words and their uses in the form of language. For me, I think that’s definitely a prodigious feat. Your memory is doing great if you can speak any language at all and it can help you function in any ... Continue Reading

Laws of Learning - The Law of Revision
Many people have not come to realize that their memory can recall tens of thousands of words and their uses in the form of language. For me, I think that’s definitely a prodigious feat. Your memory is doing great if you can speak any language at all and it can help you function in any area or field in the society if you can maximize it. Moreover, we only use a fraction of our memory’s capacity per time.
In a post on four laws of learning, we discussed four important laws of learning – repetition or recitation, over-learning, confidence and reintegration. Here, we will discuss another important law of learning – the law of revision:

The Law of Revision
 
According to Mahesh Kapadia in “Increasing memory Power”, “revision is the art, science and skill of learning. If you know the art, then you will able to recall more from your mind.”
He also went further to say that, if we are reading for two hours, we should divide the hours into periods of ten minutes in order to try and recall whatever we’ve studied within each period of ten minutes. Then, retention will take place. Doing the second revision after 24 hours, the third revision after seven days and the fourth after 30 days will fortify the retention of the memory. If you revise your notes in this manner, your recall percentage will increase.
So, study your note like you eat food. You eat food in small bits, similarly you should study your note in small sections. We start forgetting little by little, what we have retained. So revision becomes essential. If we do not revise a subject after an interval, we will forget it completely after a lapse of few days. Revision after an interval of few days is important.
I have observed that during examination time, students’ memories are usually fresh with what they’ve studied and revised for the exams, but sooner or later after the exams are over, they forget most of what they had studied for exams. How much  of what you’ve read you remember or forget is dependent on you.
Supposing you prepared for a test and you retention of all you read initially was 100 percent:
– After 10 days, if you did not revise those things you read earlier, your retention would be reduced to 80 percent and 20 percent of what you read would have been forgotten.
– After 20 days, it would come down to 60 percent.
– After 30 days, it would fall down to 40 percent.
– 90 days later, it would come down to 10 percent, and after 120 days you’ll be left with only 5 percent or probably with nothing.
If you do not revise regularly whatever you have earlier learnt, it will begin to fade and gradually vanish. Therefore, if you want to retain it for a long time, revision at intervals is very essential and compulsory.

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